CELEBRATE A ONE HUNDRED YEAR TRADITION

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Aunt Kate’s Restaurant serves small sweet oysters harvested from the Tolomoto River/Intercoastal Waterway and fried to a golden crispness. Eating oysters at this spot continues a long tradition. They have been served under a grove of live oak trees alongside this river for more than 100 years. Buildings have changed, owners have changed, but an eating establishment continues to occupy this spot. You can enjoy some very good food waterside at Aunt Kate’s.

The crooks of the live oak branches are like artwork in the sunshine. Tiered decks step down to the water. At Sunday lunch we were serenaded by a musician who included one of my favorites––“Big Rock Candy Mountain”. This folk song was originally written and recorded in 1928 by Harry McClintock and later sung by the likes of Pete Seeger and Woody Guthrie, climbing the charts at different times during the twentieth century.

The charm and comfort of Aunt Kate’s are undeniable.

Aunt Kate’s is located about two and a half miles north of the Vilano Bridge on the Tolomoto River. A sign on A1A alerts you to turn left. Drive nearly to the water and there it is under the spreading trees with plenty of parking.

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Here they serve some very good food. Buttermilk ranch dressing topped my fresh salad.

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The bacon broccoli cheese soup tasted smoky and rich with big chunks of broccoli.

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Sweet and tangy pulled pork was Jerry’s choice. Look at those pickles. Makes you want to grab one.

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I had a basket of oysters with creamy dill tarter sauce I absolutely could not resist. They were the finest oysters I’ve had this winter. The menu includes all kinds of seafood and other southern style dishes. There is a full bar and outdoor seating on the water. Check out their informative website. www.aunt-kates.com

Fine food and local charm make eating in this spot as sweet as the oysters.

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